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"But this brutal act of murder, especially when given the length of time her captors had to reconsider their intentions, not only legitimizes the Bush regime's and Iraq's puppet government's claims of insurgency, but also serves to excuse and legitimize the torture and slaughter of Iraqi civilians." 

 

 

Iraqi Resistance's Fatal Blunder
THE MURDER OF MARGARET HASSAN

Posted November 18, 2004 thepeoplesvoice.org

By: Ted Lang

It is clear to the entire world that the atrocities perpetrated against the Iraqi people by the Bush administration are a carbon copy of Hitler's foreign policy towards sovereign nations first initiated some 65 years ago. It was Hitler's fascist paranoia towards German citizens as well as his overwhelming concentration and rapid deployment of mechanized military might against unprepared lesser nations that have branded him as history's most evil dictator. In the eyes of the world and its press, today's Nazification of American foreign policy and its inhumane brutality based upon racial lines of demarcation are universally considered as an abomination by any and all international standards.

And as evil begets more evil, and violence creates yet more violence, we are now apprised of yet another inhumane atrocity in the brutal and barbaric murder of Margaret Hassan. This was a woman with a Mother Teresa philosophy of gentleness and kindness that showcased a life of self-sacrifice, service and dedication in caring for the people of Iraq. Margaret Hassan was born in Ireland and married an Iraqi. She bucked the political system and its so-called correctness to do the Christian thing of dedicating her life to others, especially the children of Iraq.

She risked all to protect the vulnerability of the oppressed Iraqis under the tyranny of Bush I and II and the diabolical cynicism of an out-of-touch Clinton administration. She abandoned her origins and its comforts and demonstrated both a service to her fellow Man and her God in rejecting her own safety and security to care for those less fortunate who were being ruthlessly oppressed by her own kind. In short, these are sacrifices most commonly identified with sainthood.

Hassan in effect, rejected the political philosophy and policy initiatives of her Western heritage replacing them with her own self-generated concept of right and wrong. And she followed through by rejecting formalized and legitimized political organizations and sought a more beneficent organizational structure devoid of gain. She was a director for CARE International. She isolated herself in this manner knowing all the while that she could be targeted anytime because of her foreign origins and her isolation in helping others.

Hassan was kidnapped by what can be best described as an undefined and disorganized resistance, which is, and continues to be, completely and morally justified in opposing a foreign invasion initiated to affect Iraq's colonization by American corporate oil interests. And as has been editorially admitted to in this space, the resistance to imperialistic invasion and unprovoked attack is always justified as an acceptable mode of self-defense by any and all standards of decency allowed by all but the most despotic of governments.

Iraqis that had benefited directly from "Mama Hassan's" care took to the streets. Children crippled by Bush family bombs, rockets and artillery took to the streets in their wheelchairs, on their crutches, and with prosthetic arms and legs she provided, to protest and appeal for her safe release. The world became familiar with her humanitarianism, and now the Iraqis whom she cared for and had helped were taking to the streets begging for her release. And the whole world waited. And waited, and waited.

The heroes of war on the other side had to know of her patriotism to her newly adopted nation and religion of Islam. She spoke their language. She was, for all purposes and intents, an Iraqi citizen. In all probability, in her taped appeals early in her captivity, she knew she would be killed. Her tearful appeals are testimony to the brutality and inhumanity of her captors.

I have long hated the term "insurgents." How can people be insurrect in their own country against a foreign invader? But this wanton singularly brutal and senseless act against a former British subject that has given 30 years of her life to reduce the suffering of the Iraqi people against the protests of Iraqis, now establishes precisely what Iraqi freedom fighters really didn't need: it legitimizes the term "insurgents."

A regular army with a chain of command can and should be held accountable for war crimes. And the war crimes in Iraq are well documented. But this brutal act of murder, especially when given the length of time her captors had to reconsider their intentions, not only legitimizes the Bush regime's and Iraq's puppet government's claims of insurgency, but also serves to excuse and legitimize the torture and slaughter of Iraqi civilians. The denizens of talk radio and FOXNews can now justify Abu Ghraib and Fallujah.

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THEODORE E. LANG 11/17/04 All rights reserved. Ted Lang is a political analyst and a freelance writer.

 

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